Refugee Studies Centre
  • Oxford University
147 episodes
Public lectures and seminars from the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford Department of International Development. The Refugee Studies Centre (RSC) aims to build knowledge and understanding of the causes and effects of forced migration in order to help improve the lives of some of the world's most vulnerable people.

Episodes

HIP2015, Session: Humanitarian Innovation and The Military
2016 Jul 121h 19m 16s
Parallel session: Humanitarian Innovation and the Military 18 July 2015, 11:00-12:30, 1st Panel Room. Nathaniel Raymond, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, James Ryan, University of London. Chair: Josiah Kaplan, Humanitarian Innovation Project.
HIP2015, Session: Understanding Humanitarian Innovation In Resettlement Contexts
2016 Jul 121h 8m 25s
Parallel session: Understanding Humanitarian Innovation in Resettlement Contexts, 18 July 2015, 11:0--12:30, 2nd Panel Room. Gavin Ackerly, Asylum Seeker Resource Centre Innovation Hub: ‘Innovative ways of creating resource rich networks to support successful refugee resettlement’, Faith Nibbs, Southern Methodist University: ‘Innovative Strategies: How refugees have career-laddered in the US’, Eleanor Ott, Oxfam GB: ‘‘Forced’ innovation: A case study of US refugee resettlement’, Carrie Perkins, Southern Methodist University: ‘The Road to Resettlement: Transitions from the Thai-Burma border to Dallas, Texas’. Chair: Naohiko Omata, Humanitarian Innovation Project
HIP2015, Session: Facilitating Bottom-Up Innovation
2016 Jul 121h 28s
Parallel session: Facilitating Bottom-Up Innovation, 18 July 2015, 13:34-15:15, 2nd Panel Room Gavin Ackerly, Asylum Seeker Resource Centre Innovation Hub, Robert Hakiza, Young African Refugees for Integral Development (YARID) Uganda, Avila Kilmurray, Global Fund for Community Foundations, Olivia O’Sullivan, Innovation Hub, DFID, Amplify Project. Chair: Louise Bloom, Humanitarian Innovation Project.
HIP2015, Session: Ethics for Technology and Big Data in Humanitarian Innovation
2016 Jul 1250m 4s
Parallel session: Ethics for Technology and Big Data in Humanitarian Innovation 17 July 2015, 14:00-15:30, 1st Panel Room. Nathaniel Raymond, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative’s Signal Program: ‘Applying Humanitarian Principles to the Collection and Use of Digital Data in order to Identify and Mitigate Potential Risks to Vulnerable Populations’, Stefan Voigt, DLR Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information, and Josh Lyons, Human Rights Watch: ‘Between transparency and sensitivity: considerations on the use of very high resolution satellite mapping technologies for humanitarian operations and human rights investigations’ Chair: Anaïs Rességuier, Sciences Po Paris.
HIP2015, Session: Community-based Food Production in Humanitarian Contexts
2016 Jul 1216m 47s
Parallel session: Community-based Food Production in Humanitarian Contexts 18 July 2015, 13:45-15:15. Panellists; Mikey Tomkins, CitizenD: ‘Refugee communities in Dallas: Develop community based urban agriculture in Vickery Meadow’
HIP2015, Session: Humanitarian Innovation: How to balance short-term results with long-term vision?
2016 Jul 1246m 58s
Parallel session: Humanitarian Innovation: How to balance short-term results with long-term vision? 17 July 2015, 14:00-15:30. Panellists Kim Scriven, Humanitarian Innovation Fund, Pascal Daudin, ICRC, Johan Karlsson, Better Shelter. Chair: Marpe Tanaka, MSF Sweden Innovation Unit.
Making sense of the EU-Turkey deal
2016 Mar 301h 33m 25s
A panel discuss the deal between the EU and Turkey regarding immigration Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/
Refugees – what’s wrong with history?
2015 Jun 2345m 7s
Peter Gatrell gives a talk for the Refugee Studies Centre podcast series. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/
UNHCR's protection guidelines: what role for external voices?
2015 Jun 2354m 55s
Guy Goodwin-Gill gives a talk for the Refugee Studies Centre podcast series. In 1977, as national refugee status determination procedures were gaining new life, State members of UNHCR’s Executive Committee asked the Office to provide guidance on the interpretation and application of the 1951 Convention/1967 Protocol. The outcome was the 1979 UNHCR Handbook, still widely cited in courts around the world, but substantially unchanged notwithstanding successive ‘re-issues’. Following adoption of its Agenda for Protection in 2000, UNHCR sought to keep up with jurisprudential developments and emergent issues by publishing supplementary guidelines, for example, on exclusion, gender, social group, and children; these were mostly drafted in-house, like the original Handbook, and without any formal input from States or other stakeholders. Following criticism of its 2013 guidelines on military service, however, UNHCR began to consider how external input could be usefully and effectively managed, for example, through the circulation of drafts for comment. Authoritative and influential guidelines will need a solid methodology when it comes to synthesizing best practice and pointing the way ahead, and UNHCR cannot just rely on its statutory and treaty role in ‘supervising the application’ of the 1951 Convention. In some respects, its task is analogous to that of the International Law Commission, incorporating both codification (identifying where States now see the law) and progressive development (showing how the law should develop consistently, if protection is to keep in step with need). So, what are the issues on which further guidance is needed today? What, if any, are the limits to interpretation, and when are new texts required? In drafting guidelines, who should be consulted? And how should others’ views and analysis be taken into account?
Understanding global refugee policy: the case of naturalisation in Tanzania
2015 Jun 2345m 1s
Dr James Milner gives a talk for the Refugee Studies Centre seminar series. Despite the attention paid to new examples of ‘global refugee policy’, we know surprisingly little about the process by which it is made and implemented. Building on the December 2014 special issue of the Journal of Refugee Studies, this seminar introduces the concept of ‘global refugee policy’ and argues for a more critical and systematic examination of the interests and actors that shape the process of making and implementing policy. Drawing on efforts to implement global policy with respect to protracted refugee situations in the context of Tanzania, the seminar considers the range of national and local factors that limited efforts to realise naturalisation for Burundian refugees, and outlines an approach to the future study of global refugee policy.